Iceni Labs enters MoU with 2DM to develop graphene-based products for the defense, automotive and aerospace markets

Iceni Labs, a spin-out from Imperial College London, has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Singapore’s 2D Materials (2DM) that will see the companies combine their respective expertise to develop and market graphene-based products for the defense, automotive and aerospace markets in Europe, North America and the Middle East.

Iceni Labs, a spin-out from Imperial College London, aims to exploit the properties of graphene for devices aimed at the defense market. 2DM manufactures graphene as an additive to enhance the properties of many industrial materials. The MoU will explore the potential to use 2DM’s graphene as an industrial additive to enhance the properties of Iceni Labs-developed industrial products including microphones, weapons optics devices and coatings.

Vaulta secures Federal government grant

Australia-based battery case developer Vaulta has been awarded a Federal Government grant to commercialize its battery casings for the electric vehicle market.

Vaulta received a grant of AUD$297,500 (around USD$219,000) from the Federal Government’s Accelerating Commercialization grants program to commercialize its low-cost and light-weight graphene-enhanced battery modules.

Skeleton Technologies enters agreement with CAF Power & Automation for supercapacitors for trams

Skeleton Technologies has signed a contract with CAF Power & Automation, a global manufacturer of electric power solutions for the rail industry, to supply supercapacitors in trams powered by CAF P&A’s OESS-s (On Board Energy Storage Systems).

Skeleton's supecapacitors chosen by CAF image

Skeleton’s cells will reportedly be included in Greentech OESS portfolio already used by some of the leading railway companies worldwide to offer cutting edge solutions to energy recovery, peak shaving and catenary-free applications.

New graphene-based aerogel could reduce aircraft engine noise

University of Bath researchers have developed a graphene-based light material that can reduce aircraft engine noise and improve passenger comfort.

Meringue-like material could make aircraft as quiet as a hairdryer image

The graphene oxide-polyvinyl alcohol aerogel weighs just 2.1kg per cubic meter, making it the lightest sound insulation material ever manufactured. It could be used as insulation within aircraft engines to reduce noise by up to 16 decibels - reducing the 105-decibel roar of a jet engine taking off to a sound closer to that of a hair-dryer.