Graphene-Info: the graphene experts

Graphene-Info is the world's leading graphene industry portal since 2009. We provide a multitude of services to the graphene market based on our extensive knowledge hub and industry connections.

Graphene is the strongest, thinnest and most conductive material known to man. With such remarkable properties, it is no wonder that graphene enables exciting new applications in electronics, energy, medicine, aerospace and many more markets.

Recent graphene News

Soft graphene-based probe monitors brain and gut chemistry

Scientists from Michigan State University and Stanford University have invented the “NeuroString” — a graphene-based implantable probe that enables researchers to study the chemistry of brain and gut health.

Graphene implant monitors brain and gut chemistry imageThree flexible NeuroString sensors. Credit: Courtesy of Jinxing Li

“The mainstream way people are trying to understand the brain is to read and record electric signals,” said Jinxing Li, the paper’s first author and an assistant professor in MSU’s College of Engineering. “But chemical signals play just as significant a role in brain communication, and they are also directly related to diseases. My lab at MSU focuses on developing cutting-edge neuroprobes and microrobotics.”

On SP Nano’s cutting-edge graphene and CNT dispersion technology

This is a sponsored post by SP Nano

Israel-based SP Nano developed a unique dispersion technology based on a genetically engineered exceptionally stable protein that is highly suitable for carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) dispersion, including graphene, CNTs and carbon black.

Following years of intensive R&D, SP Nano is now offering its dispersions to application developers. This is the first time that carbon nanomaterials can “truly” be dispersed and achieve cutting-edge performance across a wide range of applications.

SP Nano’s dispersions are now being applied to a wide range of applications, such as

  • Coatings (textiles, surfaces, powders, etc.)
  • Dispersions in matrices (resins, polymers, etc.)
  • Liquid formulations (coolants, inks, slurries, etc.)

Vector Homes secures funding for graphene-based construction materials development

A UK-based start-up called Vector Homes, working on new techniques and materials for sustainable housing using graphene, has announced securing nearly £200,000 (almost USD$245,800) in Smart Grant funding by Innovate UK.

The money will help fund a research program to develop graphene-enhanced recycled plastic formulations for residential construction. The project will enhance polymers with nano-materials to increase strength, durability, thermal and acoustic performance and further recyclability.

Versarien launches graphene-based superparamagnetic material

Versarien has announced the launch of a new hybrid nanomaterial that has superparamagnetic properties, which can be used across a range of applications, like defense and healthcare. The new material combines graphene with both iron oxide and manganese oxide nanoparticles and its development was led by Versarien's 62% owned subsidiary, Gnanomat.

The superparamagnetic material combines graphene with both iron oxide and manganese oxide nanoparticles that provide the material with magnetic properties. In return, graphene provides electrical conductivity to these electrically insulating metal oxides. Magnetic nanocomposites can readily respond to external magnetic fields which allow them to be manipulated. Potential applications of the material include the treatment of wastewater whereby pollutants are adsorbed onto the graphene surface. The material could also lends be used in biomedical and biotechnology applications, or defense applications requiring the shielding of electromagnetic fields. Magnetic manipulation could allow the recovery and recycling of the graphene, something that could not be done with normal graphene compounds.

A graphene-based catalytic condenser makes abundant materials act like precious metals

A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, the University of Massachusetts Amherst and University of California, Santa Barbara have invented a graphene-based device that electronically converts one metal into behaving like another to use as a catalyst for speeding chemical reactions.

The fabricated device, called a “catalytic condenser,” is the first to demonstrate that alternative materials that are electronically modified to provide new properties can yield faster, more efficient chemical processing.

Viritech launches graphene-enhanced "hypercar"

Last year's announcement about a British engineering company called Viritech that is working on an ambitious hydrogen-powered hypercar was recently followed by an update on that same company, that unveiled its 745kW hydrogen-powered hypercar, styled by Italian car design specialist Pininfarina.

Graphene-enhanced Apricale hypercar image

The Apricale, which produces zero emissions, made its debut at Goodwood’s Festival of Speed. It was said that the Apricale uses ‘graphene-reinforced hydrogen pressure vessels’, which was explained to mean that the hydrogen storage tanks form a structural element of the chassis. This reduces weight and cost, while simplifying the structure.

Researchers develop method to measure the migration of carbon atoms on the surface of graphene

Researchers at the University of Vienna have measured the migration of carbon atoms on the surface of graphene for the first time. Although the atoms move too quickly to be directly observed with an electron microscope, their effect on the stability of the material can now be determined indirectly while the material is heated on a microscopic hot plate.

Graphene has been the subject of intensive research for years, but it has not been possible to measure some fundamental processes, including the motion of carbon atoms on its surface. This random migration is the atomic origin of the phenomenon of diffusion - the natural motion of particles such as atoms or molecules in gases, liquids or solids. In the atmosphere and the oceans, this phenomenon ensures an even distribution of oxygen and salt. In the technical industries, it is of central importance for steel production, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cells, to name a few examples. In materials science, diffusion at the surface of solids explains how certain catalytic reactions proceed and many crystalline materials including graphene are grown.