Electronics

Researchers show that hydrodynamic electrons flow through materials without electrical resistance

Scientists from Israel's Weizmann Institute of Science, in collaboration with teams at Manchester University and UC Irvine,  have shown that an electronic fluid can flow through materials without any electrical resistance, thereby perfectly eliminating a fundamental source of resistance that forms the ultimate limit for ballistic electrons. This result could open the door to improved electronic devices that do not heat up as much as existing technologies.

When electrons flow in electrical wires, they lose part of their energy, which is wasted as heat. This heating is a major problem in everyday electronics. The heating occurs because electrical conductors are never perfect and have a resistance for the flow of electrical currents. Typically, this resistance originates from the scattering of the flowing electrons by imperfections in the host material. But it stands to reason that a perfect conductor, devoid of any imperfections, would have zero resistance. However, even if the conductor is perfectly clean and free from imperfections, the resistance does not vanish. Instead, a new source of resistance emerges, known as the Landauer-Sharvin resistance. In an electrical conductor, electrons flow in quantum channels, much like cars in highway lanes. Similar to highway lanes, each electronic channel has a finite capacity to conduct electrons, limited by the quantum of conductance. For a given conductor, the number of quantum channels is finite and determined by its physical width. Thus, even a perfect electronic device, devoid of any imperfections, will never have infinite conductance. It will always have resistance. In the absence of interactions between electrons, this Landauer-Sharvin resistance is unavoidable, putting a fundamental lower bound on the heating of computer chips, which becomes even more severe as transistors become smaller.

Read the full story Posted: Sep 14,2022

Dell patents design for graphene-enhanced wireless charging clip for laptops

Electronics and computer giant Dell has patented the design of a graphene-enhanced detachable clip for laptop computers, meant for wireless charging.

The clip uses a printed graphene charging coil built with a ferrite sheet as well as magnetic elements to hold the clip in place. This reportedly avoids increasing the size and thickness of the laptop. When the clip is installed on the laptop, charging circuitry is configured to supply inductive power to charge an auxiliary device such as a smartphone.

Read the full story Posted: Aug 12,2022

HydroGraph launches new graphene ink

HydroGraph Clean Power has launched its patented graphene ink. The Company sees this development as a significant step toward the production of inexpensive, foldable, and wearable electronics.

This is a significant milestone in renewable technology production. From touch screen displays, biosensors, radio frequency identification tags, electric vehicle batteries, and more, the technology’s applications are vast, said Stuart Jara, HydroGraph chief executive officer.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 14,2022

Graphenea launches $99 miniGFET fully-packaged devices

Graphenea launched two new products out of its Graphene Foundry, which they call mGFET or miniGFET. This is Graphenea's highest value-chain products, which are manufactured and packaged in chip carriers, and can be used together with the freshly released Graphenea Card for seamless sensor development.

Graphenea miniGFET photo

The mGFET is available from $99, and as it is a fully-package device, it is ready to be integrated into standard electronics. Order volume can range from a few devices for early prototyping, to JEDEC trays with hundreds of devices which are compatible with automated pick & place routines.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 15,2022

2D-EPL offers a chance to test graphene-based sensors on large scale

The 2D Experimental Pilot Line (2D-EPL), that originated from the Graphene Flagship, recently launched its first customizable wafer run.

As one of five multi-project wafer (MPW) runs, this first phase is targeting sensor applications. Companies, universities and research institutes can include their designs as dies on joint wafers, to test their ideas for devices on a larger scale at relatively low costs. The first 2D-EPL MPW run opened in February and the call closes on 30 June 2022. The manufacturing stage of the MPW run will take place between 1 September and 31 October 2022.

Read the full story Posted: May 09,2022

Researchers wrapped droplets in graphene for better sensors, microchips and batteries

Researchers from the University of Sussex, the University of Brighton and CNRS have developed a way to wrap emulsion droplets with graphene and other 2D materials by reducing the coatings down to atomically-thin nanosheet layers. The team said this could ‘significantly advance’ the new technology area of liquid electronics, enhancing the functionality and sustainability of potential applications in printed electronics, wearable health monitors and even batteries.

The scientists were able to create electrically-conducting liquid emulsions that are the lowest-loading graphene networks ever reported just 0.001 vol%. This means that the subsequent liquid electronic technology will be both cheaper and more sustainable because it will require less graphene or other 2D nanosheets coating the droplets.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 23,2022

UK-based Paragraf raises $60 million in its latest financing round

UK-based graphene developer Paragraf has raised $60 million from the UK's Future Fund, the CIA-backed In-Q-Tel and other investors. The funds will be used to accelerate the company's device development, production and market launch.

Paragraf's newly launched Hall Effect sensors based on graphene image

Paragraf produces its own CVD graphene materials, which it then uses to create devices for the sensor, energy and semiconductor markets. The company introduced its first product, a graphene-based hall-effect sensor back in 2020, and it has recently concluded a study to test the deployment of graphene as an OLED electrode material.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 01,2022

Graphene assists in observing the elusive Schwinger effect

Researchers at The University of Manchester, MIT and other international collaborators have succeeded in observing the so-called Schwinger effect, an elusive process that normally occurs only in cosmic events. By applying high currents through specially designed graphene-based devices, the team - based at the National Graphene Institute - succeeded in producing particle-antiparticle pairs from a vacuum.

A vacuum is assumed to be completely empty space, without any matter or elementary particles. However, it was predicted by Nobel laureate Julian Schwinger 70 years ago that intense electric or magnetic fields can break down the vacuum and spontaneously create elementary particles.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 28,2022

Graphene Square shows transparent graphene toaster at CES

At the recent CES event, South Korea-based Graphene Square presented its 'kitchen styler' - a transparent toaster that uses graphene.

In addition to tracking the level of toasting of the bread, the device is also said to offer 50% less power consumption and enable outdoor cooking with rechargeable batteries. The device is also foldable and expandable to dual cooking/warming plates and connects to mobile devices for recipe download/control.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 11,2022