Novel graphene fiber electrode could assist in developing advanced therapies in bioelectronic medicine

An international team that included researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) and the University of Houston has helped progress electroceutical research for treatment of diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and sepsis.

Coating steps of sutrodes imageCoating steps of extruded Pt-rGO electrodes. Image from article

The team released their latest paper, that builds on previous studies where the team reported on the 'Sutrode' - a graphene based electrode created using the fabrication technique known as fiber wet spinning.

GMG to support Queensland University of Technology pilot for piezo-supercapacitors for self-powered medical implants

Graphene Manufacturing Group (GMG) has formalized its support to Queensland University of Technology – Centre for Biomedical Technologies (“CBT”) for the development of Piezo-Supercapacitors for Self-Powered Medical Implants through a pilot project agreement. The Agreement details GMG’s contribution of expertise and graphene for the project.

GMG Supports Queensland University of Technology project for supercapacitors for medical implants image

The initial Industry Engagement Grant entitled “Piezoelectric Supercapacitors for Self-Powered Medical Implants” was awarded to Professor Cameron Brown, Associate Professor Deepak Dubal, Dr. Hong Duc Pham and the Chief Scientific Officer of GMG, Dr. Ashok Kumar Nanjundan.

Researchers experiment with LIG to create improved wearable health devices

A Penn State-led international research team (led by Professor Huanyu “Larry” Cheng at Penn State) recently published two studies that could boost research and development of future motion detection, tactile sensing and health monitoring devices.

Graphene made with lasers for wearable health devices image

There are various substances that can be converted into carbon to create graphene through laser radiation, in a process called laser-induced graphene (LIG). The resulting product can have specific properties determined by the original material. The team set out to test this process and has reached interesting conclusions.

How concerned should we be about graphene's toxicity?

The potential toxicity of graphene and graphene oxide has been on people's minds lately. This is an area that has always received some attention, but recently there have been rumors and wild speculations about the adoption of graphene oxide and the risks involved.

Grapene toxicity poll results (August 2021)

Researchers have been studying the toxicity of graphene and graphene oxide for many years. While these materials have not yet been established as completely safe for use, there are quite a few research results that indicate that graphene can be relatively safe under the appropriate conditions.

Chalmers team develops a graphene-based material that kills bacteria on implants

Researchers at Chalmers University have developed a new method to prevent infections relating to medical implants, by covering a graphene-based material with bactericidal molecules.

“Through our research, we have succeeded in binding water-insoluble antibacterial molecules to the graphene, and having the molecules release in a controlled, continuous manner from the material. This is an essential requirement for the method to work. The way in which we bind the active molecules to the graphene is also very simple, and could be easily integrated into industrial processes,” explains Santosh Pandit, researcher at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering at Chalmers, and first author of the study.