Medicine

Archer Materials announces wettable graphene transistor for biochip tech

Australia-based Archer Materials has developed a graphene-based field effect transistor (gFET) that can operate in wet environments. The gFET device is a sensing component which will be used in medical applications, like for digitizing biologically-relevant signals such as those from target analytes of viruses or bacteria. The biochip innovation will be integrated with advanced microfluidic systems to allow the manufacturing of mini lab-on-a-chip device platforms designed for medical diagnostics.

The company explained that the integration of gFETs with on-chip microfluidics potentially enables multiplexing, such as the ability to parallelize the detection of multiple biologically relevant targets in droplet-size liquid samples on a chip. The innovation can prevent liquids from shorting the integrated circuit, while simultaneously obtaining electronic signals using the liquid as part of the device. 

Read the full story Posted: Oct 24,2022

Researchers use graphene FET biosensor for simultaneous detection of influenza and SARS-CoV-2

Researchers from University of Texas at Austin have developed an antibody (Ab)-modified graphene field effect transistor (GFET)-based biosensor for precise and rapid influenza A virus (IAV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) protein detection and differentiation.

The sensor chip that was developed comprised of four GFETs in a quadruple arrangement, separated by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) enclosures. Every quarter was biochemically functionalized with SARS-CoV-2 and IAV antigen-targeted Abs, one chemically passivated control, and one bare control. The third (chemically passivated) GFET was deployed to ensure that the results observed were due to Ab-antigen interaction rather than electronic fluctuations or drifts.

Read the full story Posted: Oct 18,2022

Researchers develop moisture-resistant, stretchable NOx gas sensors based on laser-induced graphene

Researchers from Penn State and China's Hebei University of Technology, as well as additional collaborators from China, have developed a new water-resistant gas sensor for accurate, continuous monitoring of nitrogen dioxide and other gases in humid environments.

Moisture-resistant, stretchable NOx gas sensors based on laser-induced graphene for environmental monitoring and breath analysis image

 

The new water-resistant gas sensor can be worn under the nose to detect nitrogen dioxide in the breath, the concentration of which may indicate potential pulmonary diseases.

Read the full story Posted: Aug 02,2022

Researchers develop sensors based on graphene foam for better prosthetics and robotics

Researchers from Integrated Graphene and the University of the West of Scotland (UWS) have reported a project to develop graphene-enhanced pressure sensors that provide enhanced capabilities to robots, helping improve their motor skills and dexterity. The project was supported by the Scottish Research Partnership in Engineering (SRPe) and the National Manufacturing Institute for Scotland (NMIS) Industry Doctorate Program in Advanced Manufacturing.

Professor Des Gibson, Director of the Institute of Thin Films, Sensors and Imaging at UWS and project principal investigator, said: Over recent years the advancements in the robotics industry have been remarkable, however, due to a lack of sensory capabilities, robotic systems often fail to execute certain tasks easily. For robots to reach their full potential, accurate pressure sensors, capable of providing greater tactile ability, are required. Our collaboration with Integrated Graphene Ltd, has led to the development of advanced pressure sensor technology, which could help transform robotic systems.

Read the full story Posted: Aug 01,2022

Paragraf announces Innovate UK grant to develop graphene-based diagnostic tool

Paragraf has announced its plan to develop a new generation of graphene-based, in-vitro diagnostic products that will give results within a few minutes.

The Company is starting a two-year program to develop a proof-of-concept combined PCT (procalcitonin) and CRP (C-reactive protein) test, on a single panel. This collaboration utilizes a GBP £550,000 (around USD$658,000) Biomedical Catalyst grant award from Innovate UK, the UK’s innovation agency.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 19,2022

Soft graphene-based probe monitors brain and gut chemistry

Scientists from Michigan State University and Stanford University have invented the NeuroString — a graphene-based implantable probe that enables researchers to study the chemistry of brain and gut health.

Graphene implant monitors brain and gut chemistry imageThree flexible NeuroString sensors. Credit: Courtesy of Jinxing Li

The mainstream way people are trying to understand the brain is to read and record electric signals, said Jinxing Li, the paper’s first author and an assistant professor in MSU’s College of Engineering. But chemical signals play just as significant a role in brain communication, and they are also directly related to diseases. My lab at MSU focuses on developing cutting-edge neuroprobes and microrobotics.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 29,2022

Versarien launches graphene-based superparamagnetic material

Versarien has announced the launch of a new hybrid nanomaterial that has superparamagnetic properties, which can be used across a range of applications, like defense and healthcare. The new material combines graphene with both iron oxide and manganese oxide nanoparticles and its development was led by Versarien's 62% owned subsidiary, Gnanomat.

The superparamagnetic material combines graphene with both iron oxide and manganese oxide nanoparticles that provide the material with magnetic properties. In return, graphene provides electrical conductivity to these electrically insulating metal oxides. Magnetic nanocomposites can readily respond to external magnetic fields which allow them to be manipulated. Potential applications of the material include the treatment of wastewater whereby pollutants are adsorbed onto the graphene surface. The material could also lends be used in biomedical and biotechnology applications, or defense applications requiring the shielding of electromagnetic fields. Magnetic manipulation could allow the recovery and recycling of the graphene, something that could not be done with normal graphene compounds.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 27,2022

Graphene e-tattoo allows for continuous cuffless monitoring of blood pressure

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M University have developed a graphene-based electronic tattoo that can be worn on the wrist for hours and deliver continuous blood pressure measurements at an accuracy level exceeding nearly all available options on the market today. This could signify an alternative for the currently used cuff-based devices that constrict around the arm to give a reading, as well as improve accuracy levels.

Continuous cuffless monitoring of arterial blood pressure via graphene bioimpedance tattoos image

The wearable is based on electrical bioimpedance and leverages atomically thin, self-adhesive, lightweight and unobtrusive graphene electronic tattoos as human bioelectronic interfaces. The graphene electronic tattoos are used to monitor arterial BP for >300 min, a period tenfold longer than reported in previous studies.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 22,2022

Researchers develop graphene-enhanced strain-perception-strengthening enabled biomimetic soft skin

Researchers at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), led by Prof. CHEN Tao, have designed strain-perception-strengthening (SPS) enabled biomimetic soft skin, which realizes the dynamic transformation from tactile to pain perception.

The synthetic skin is said to be elastic, conductive, and adaptive. It is composed of elastomeric thin-film and assembled graphene nanosheets with an interlocked structural interface.

Read the full story Posted: May 30,2022

Researchers develop a graphene platform for extra sensitive detection of viral proteins

Scientists at Swansea University, Biovici Ltd and the National Physical Laboratory have developed a graphene-based method to detect viruses in very small volumes.

Researchers develop graphene platform of biosensors imageGraphene device chip attached to an electrical connector, with two 5 μL HCVcAg samples (one applied on each graphene resistor). Image credit: Swansea U

The work followed a successful Innovate UK project developing graphene for use in biosensors devices that can detect tiny levels of disease markers.

Read the full story Posted: May 12,2022