GMG and Rio Tinto enter agreement for energy storage solutions

Graphene Manufacturing Group (GMG) has announced that it and Rio Tinto Group have signed a non-binding agreement to collaborate on energy saving and storage solutions. Rio Tinto is a mining and metals company that operates in 35 countries.

Together, GMG and Rio Tinto will explore the use of energy saving products in Rio Tinto's operations, explore working together to support GMG's development of Graphene Aluminium-Ion ("G+Al") batteries, and collaborate on mining and other industrial applications.

Researchers succeed in synthesizing graphyne

Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and Qingdao University of Science and Technology have managed to synthesize an illusive form of carbon called graphyne. Graphyne has long been of interest to scientists because of its similarities to graphene. However, despite decades of work and theorizing, only a few fragments have ever been created before now.

Graphyne created for first time image

"The whole audience, the whole field, is really excited that this long-standing problem, or this imaginary material, is finally getting realized," said Yiming Hu, lead author on the paper.

Egypt enters MOU with Energy 3 to produce graphene from waste

Egypt's Ministry of Foreign Affairs has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Energy 3 to build a waste recycling station that produces biofuel and graphene.

The Global Environment Facility had reportedly granted Egypt $8 million to localize electronic and medical waste recycling technology. It had equally granted Egypt $8.1 million to carry out the Sustainable Management of Persistent Organic Pollutants (PoPs) Project.

Reduced graphene oxide enables stretchable strain sensor for monitoring of physical activities

A new work by scientists at India's National Institute of Technology Rourkela describes the fabrication of extremely flexible, accurate, and robust strain sensors employing electrochemically produced reduced graphene oxide (rGO).

Conventional silicon-based strain sensors have relatively low flexibility of less than 5% and inadequate responsiveness, making them unsuitable for detecting both small and large strains. Aside from the flexibility constraint, typical silicon-based strain sensors need sophisticated manufacturing procedures such as microelectromechanical and deposition of thin films. Flexibility, responsiveness, and endurance are critical characteristics of wearable devices because they aid in the integration of the sensors over non-uniform interfaces such as the human body. Aside from elasticity, these products also need a sensor capable of detecting minute deformations caused by physiological factors and physical activity.

Versarien's graphene revenues grew 170% in the past year

Versarien announced its latest financial results. The company reports increased interest from global companies, with an increase in revenues and a drop in net loss.

In the year that ended on March 2022, Versarien's revenues grew to £7.6 million, up from £5.7 million a year ago. The group's graphene revenues grew by 170% to £1.9 million. The company's operating loss decreased to £1.04 million (down from £1.88 a year ago). Versarien reported it had £3.1 million in cash and equivalents at the end of the quarter.

Skeleton Technologies announces agreement with ZPUE to provide supercapacitors to the Polish market

Skeleton Technologies and ZPUE, the largest manufacturer of electrical devices for electrical power distribution utilities in Poland, have entered into a commercial agreement to provide energy storage solutions to the Polish market.

The two companies signed a Letter of Intent under which Skeleton should supply supercapacitors for rail wayside storage at 200 MW per year from 2023 to 2025.